Friday, September 23

Second Nerd Post of the Week

Moving to a town of 100 000 people I was already anticipating library disappointment (yes, that is a real thing).  It isn't that I don't appreciate a library that tries hard but for two years I had access to the TORONTO public library.  99 branches.  You want to read the fairly obscure "It's Our Turn to Eat"?  13 copies.  Feeling like some Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows?  Check out one of the 388 copies.  You can see why I was expecting to be underwhelmed.

Because I had no proof of my address I was forced to wait over a week before I could get my hands on my library card.  Plus they wanted me to PAY for it.  Ok, just $10 but still.  Before even physically entering the library I had run a completely non-scientific survey of the Red Deer library catalogue to determine if they offered my selections and things were not looking good, dear friends.  I got my card, browsed around quickly and went to the check out.  Ready to leave I almost walked away when I remembered to ask about suggesting books for purchase.  That one remark opened a WHOLE NEW WORLD (unbelievable sights, indescribable feelings) of librariness.  There is a secret *shhh* library card you can request and a secret online database that allows you access to ALL 290 BRANCHES in Alberta and their entire holdings.  Take that TPL with your 99 - well, thanks to Rob Ford probably even fewer soon.  So, not only can I browse the holdings of the entire province of Alberta and have them sent directly to my nearest library location I can also use the library in any other city in the network, take out books in person there (for example, Edmonton) and return said books to any other branch in the network (say, Red Deer).  Ding ding ding!  Library heaven.

3 comments:

Beth said...

at the start of this entry, i was all sad for you, but now i'm JEALOUS.

word up.

Cindy said...

We can do the same thing in Saskatchewan! Yippee!!!!!

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